Volume 8 Issue 133
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 13-May-2006 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 14-May-2006

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
Vidyya.
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Study suggests tension headache may actually be TMJD

People whose recurrent headaches have been diagnosed as tension-related actually may be suffering from temporomandibular muscle and joint disorder, or TMJD, a study headed by a researcher from the University at Buffalo's School of Dental Medicine has shown. more  

Studies shed new light on why exercise can protect against skin and bowel cancers

Two studies published today (Saturday 13 May) have shown that exercise can protect against skin and bowel cancer, and they have identified new mechanisms that could be responsible for this effect. more

Most sexual assaults drug facilitated, UIC study claims

Almost 62 percent of sexual assaults were found to be drug facilitated, and almost 5 percent of the victims were given classic 'date-rape' drugs, according to a new study at the University of Illinois at Chicago. more  

Family refusal is biggest obstacle to improving UK organ donor rate

The biggest obstacle to improving the organ donation rate in the United Kingdom is the number of relatives who refuse consent, say researchers in this week's BMJ. more

A bone of contention in drug-induced osteomalacia 

Long-term therapy with some antiepileptic drugs and antibiotics can cause osteomalacia, a condition marked by softening of the bones that is usually the result of vitamin D and calcium deficiency. However, the molecular mechanism of drug-induced osteomalacia remains unclear. more

Young adults happier than adolescents  

Although young adults are faced with a diversity of life choices, they seem to be coming to terms with themselves and their lives in their 20s, says new University of Alberta research that shows psychological well-being improves after adolescence and girls improve faster than boys. more

Space technology to help hospitals contain spread of avian flu infection

In response to concerns from hospitals to prepare for eventual pandemic flu outbreaks, the French company AirInSpace, with support from ESA's Technology Transfer Programme, has successfully adapted technology developed to protect astronauts for use in critical care centres to protect immune-deficient patients against airborne pathogens such as the avian flu virus. more

 

In response to concerns from hospitals to prepare for eventual pandemic flu outbreaks, the French company AirInSpace, has adapted technology developed to protect astronauts for use in critical care centers to protect immune-deficient patients against pathogens such as the avian flu virus.