Volume 8 Issue 135
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 15-May-2006 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 16-May-2006

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
Vidyya.
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Acidity in the brain could hold the key to stroke treatment

Development of a new technique for detecting brain damage caused by stroke has been boosted up by a 1m grant to scientists at The University of Manchester. Professor Gareth Morris of the School of Chemistry and Professor Risto Kauppinen of the University of Birmingham are to lead the development of a new non-invasive technique which measures acidity (pH) in the brain. more  

Fast pharmacy access to the morning-after pill could prevent 10% more unwanted pregnancies

Pharmacies who provide fast and convenient access to the morning-after pill could be helping to prevent 10 per cent more unwanted pregnancies, according to a study in the latest British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. more

Full year of treatment helps infants and children with toxoplasmosis

The first long-term study shows that treatment with pyrimethamine and sulfadiazine (two anti-parasitic drugs) during the first year of life leads to a lasting reduction in brain and eye damage for children with congenital toxoplasmosis. more  

Two new recipes for bird-flu fighter Tamiflu

A shortage of star anise is the major bottleneck in production of Tamiflu (oseltamivir), and a key reason for the shortage of Tamiflu that emerged in 2005. Tamiflu is the drug being stockpiled around the world for use in combating a possible epidemic of avian influenza. Star anise has been used for centuries to give a pungent, licorice-like flavor to Chinese foods and western favorites like Pernod and anisette. Grown mainly in China, it now provides the starting material shikimic acid for making Tamiflu. more

Household antiseptic on farm fields 

Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) have gotten a lot of attention for passing through conventional sewage treatment plants and winding up in lakes, rivers and other bodies of water. Relatively little research, however, has been done on the fate of PPCPs in the millions of tons of sewage sludge now applied to farm fields. Nationally, about 63 percent of sludge produced at sewage treatment facilities is applied to agricultural fields. more

Taming the toxicity of carbon nanotubes  

More incredible claims have been made about the future of nanotechnology than perhaps any other new field of science. Big claims for the small science have included many medical applications. Among them are microscopic biosensors and drug delivery modules that bring nanodevices into direct contact with living cells in the body. more

Combining work and motherhood is good for women's health

Holding down a job and being a mum in a steady relationship helps keep women healthy and in good shape over the long term, suggests research in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health. A career as a homemaker seems to increase the chances of becoming obese, indicates the research. more

 

Star anise has been used for centuries to give a pungent, licorice-like flavor to Chinese foods and western favorites like Pernod and anisette. It also provides the starting material shikimic acid for making Tamiflu. Tamiflu is the drug being stockpiled around the world for use in combating a possible epidemic of avian influenza.