Volume 8 Issue 157
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 6-Jun-2006 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 7-Jun-2006

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
© Vidyya.
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The appearance of your hands can reveal your age, study finds

Want to know a person's real age? Just look at their hands, reports a study in the June issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). According to the study, most people can accurately tell a person's age by viewing only their hands. more  

Rising health care premiums lead to lower wages and more part-time employment

In the United States, two-thirds of the nonelderly population is covered by employer-provided health care, either directly or as a dependent. In an important new study forthcoming in the July issue of the Journal of Labor Economics, Katherine Baicker (University of California, Los Angeles) and Amitabh Chandra (Harvard University) demonstrate that the rise in health insurance premiums may increase the ranks of the uninsured and the unemployed by as many as 7 million workers. more

Self-injury is prevalent among college students, but few seek medical help, study by Cornell and Princeton researchers finds

About 17 percent of college students -- 20 percent of women and 14 percent of men -- report that they have cut, burned, carved or harmed themselves in other ways, reports a new survey by Cornell and Princeton University researchers, the largest study on self-injurious behavior (SIB) in the United States to date. more  

Health risks continue well after the surgery is over

Even when all goes well, surgery patients may carry an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and possibly cancer for weeks or even years, say physician-scientists studying the unintended effects of surgery. more

Physical activity linked to improved glucose control in children with type 1 diabetes 

Children with type 1 diabetes who exercise regularly may have improved blood glucose levels compared with those who do not, and regular physical activity does not appear to increase the risk of severe hypoglycemia (low blood glucose levels), according to a report in the June issue of Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. more

Cancer drug extends cognitive function in patients with brain metastases  

The drug Xcytrin®, based on a molecule developed by chemists at The University of Texas at Austin, shows significant promise in prolonging cognitive function in patients with non-small cell lung cancer that has metastasized to the brain. more

Intermittent explosive disorder affects up to 16 million Americans

A little-known mental disorder marked by episodes of unwarranted anger is more common than previously thought, a study funded by the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) has found. Depending upon how broadly it’s defined, intermittent explosive disorder (IED) affects as many as 7.3 percent of adults — 11.5-16 million Americans — in their lifetimes. The study is based on data from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication, a nationally representative, face-to-face household survey of 9,282 U.S. adults, conducted in 2001-2003. more

 

You can tell a lot about a person by looking at his or her hands.