Volume 8 Issue 271
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 28-Sep-2006 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 29-Sep-2006

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
© Vidyya.
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Predictors of undergoing joint replacement surgery among patients with severe osteoarthritis

A progressive, destructive joint disease, osteoarthritis (OA) is a major cause of disability worldwide. Total joint arthroplasty (TJA) is a highly successful and cost-effective procedure for managing OA of the hip and knee. Despite this, analyses of hospital records show variations in the rates of TJA by region, gender, race, and socioeconomic status. While these studies tell us about who is undergoing hip and knee replacement surgery, what's missing is why--a comprehensive, rigorous examination of the predisposing factors affecting TJA rates. more  

Long-term outcomes for prostate cancer show IMRT Curative: 89 percent disease-free 8 years later

Results from the largest study of men with prostate cancer treated with high-dose, intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) show that the majority of patients remain alive with no evidence of disease after an average follow-up period of eight years. The 561 prostate cancer patients treated with IMRT at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center were classified into prognostic risk groups. After an average of eight years, 89 percent of the men in the favorable risk group were disease-free and none of the men in any group developed secondary cancers as a result of the radiation therapy. more

Landmark study of islet transplantation reveals potential benefits in uncontrolled type 1 diabetes

The results of the world's first multicenter clinical trial of islet transplantation have confirmed the technique's potential benefits in patients with difficult-to-control type 1 (or "juvenile") diabetes. Published in the September 28, 2006 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, the international team of investigators report that the Edmonton Protocol for islet transplantation can safely and successfully promote long-term stabilization of blood sugar levels in "brittle" diabetes patients and in some cases, relieve them of the need for insulin injections altogether for at least two years. more  

Solved: The mystery of flesh-eating bacteria's relentless attack

A Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) international research scholar in Israel has discovered one reason why so-called “flesh-eating” bacteria are so hard to stop. more

Inheriting a tendency to brain infection  

Might some infectious diseases run in families because one inherits susceptibility to them? Although researchers generally agree that an individual's genetic makeup contributes in subtle ways to susceptibility to infectious disease, new findings from researchers in France support the controversial idea that an error in a single gene is enough to dramatically alter an individual's susceptibility to certain infections. more

FDA approves a new drug for colorectal cancer, Vectibix  

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) today approved Vectibix (panitumumab) for the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer that has metastasized (spread to other parts of the body) following standard chemotherapy. Vectibix, a monoclonal antibody that binds to a protein called epidermal growth factor receptor or EGFR on some cancer cells, received an accelerated approval after showing effectiveness in slowing tumor growth and, in some cases, reducing the size of the tumor. more

Mouse study reveals new clues about virulence of 1918 influenza virus

The first comprehensive analysis of an animal’s immune response to the 1918 influenza virus provides new insights into the killer flu, report federally supported scientists in an article appearing online today in the journal Nature. Key among these insights, they found that the 1918 virus triggers a hyperactive immune response that may contribute to the lethality of the virus. Furthermore, their results suggest that it is the combination of all eight of the 1918 flu virus genes interacting synergistically that accounts for the exceptional virulence of this virus. more

 

Researchers have identified a single gene that predisposes individuals to herpes simplex encephalitis