Volume 8 Issue 30
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 30-Jan-2006 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 31-Jan-2006

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
© Vidyya.
All rights reserved.

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Unplanned quit attempts more likely to succeed

Unplanned attempts to stop smoking are more likely to succeed than planned ones, concludes a study published online by the BMJ today. more  

FDA approves first ever inhaled insulin combination product for treatment of diabetes

There is a new, potential alternative for many of the more than 5 million Americans who take insulin injections, with the Food and Drug Administration's approval today of the first ever inhaled insulin. Exubera, an inhaled powder form of recombinant human insulin (rDNA) for the treatment of adult patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, is the first new insulin delivery option introduced since the discovery of insulin in the 1920s. more

CDC recommends against the use of amantadine and rimantadine for the treatment or prophylaxis of influenza in the united states during the 2005–06 influenza season

While the primary strategy for preventing complications of influenza infections is annual vaccination, antiviral medications with activity against influenza viruses can be effective for the prophylaxis and treatment of influenza. Two classes of antivirals are currently available—the M2 ion channel inhibitors (i.e., the two adamantanes amantadine and rimantadine) and the neuraminidase inhibitors (i.e., oseltamivir and zanamivir). more  

Regular use of selective COX-2 inhibitors decreases risk of breast cancer

Regular use of selective COX-2 inhibitors significantly reduces the risk of breast cancer. A case-control study published today in the open access journal BMC Cancer observed that daily use of selective COX-2 inhibitors, including celecoxib (Celebrex) and rofecoxib (Vioxx), was associated with a 71% reduction in the risk of breast cancer. Non-selective COX-2 inhibitors, such as aspirin and ibuprofen, also reduced the risk of breast cancer. more

Test identifies best candidates for implanted cardiac defibrillator, screens out those not helped 

Last year, about 170,000 people in North America had devices surgically implanted to stop potentially fatal arrhythmias. For many, these were life-saving, but for others they were unnecessary, uncomfortable, and sometimes dangerous. Now a new, noninvasive test may help determine which patients are most likely to benefit from the device, known as implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD). more

The effect of vacations, retirement on your health  

Long hours and high stress on the job pump out stress hormones, raise blood pressure, and increase the risk for atherosclerosis and other heart problems. To counteract these factors, men need to work balance and relaxation into their lives. The February issue of Harvard Men’s Health Watch discusses whether vacations really have health value, and how men can make the most of retirement. more

Headache, sleep problems connected in children

Mayo Clinic researchers have found that frequent headaches in children appear to be associated with sleep problems. More than two-thirds of children studied who suffer from chronic daily headache also experience sleep disturbance, especially delay in sleep onset. For children with episodic headaches, one-fifth had sleep problems. more

 

Planning to quit? Don't. Just quit.