Volume 8 Issue 39
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 8-Feb-2006 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 9-Feb-2006

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
Vidyya.
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Older women at highest risk for hip fractures, least likely to get bone density screening

A new study by Medical College of Wisconsin researchers has found that women who most need bone density testing to determine if they have osteoporosis are the least likely to get it. They are older women who are among the highest risk groups and who suffer most if they break a bone. The study is published in the March issue of the Journal of the American Geriatric Society. more  

Low-fat diet's benefits for women less than expected, Stanford researcher says

Older women who simply reduce the amount of total fat in their diet won't generally lower their risk of breast or colorectal cancer or heart disease, according to the latest findings from the federally funded Women's Health Initiative. more

Eating less fat may lower breast-cancer risk, have little impact on colon-cancer, heart-disease risk

Adopting a low-fat diet in later life and following such a regimen for nearly a decade does not appear to have a significant impact on reducing the overall risk of breast cancer, colorectal cancer or heart disease, according to a Women's Health Initiative study that involved nearly 50,000 postmenopausal women across the United States. more  

Risk of cardiovascular disease or stroke not significantly decreased with low-fat diet

In an article in the February 8 JAMA, Barbara V. Howard, Ph.D., of Medstar Research Institute/Howard University, Washington, D.C., and colleagues with the Women's Health Initiative (WHI, a study which included nearly 50,000 women) analyzed data from the WHI Dietary Modification Trial to determine the effect of a diet low in fat intake and high in consumption of vegetables, fruits and grains on cardiovascular disease (CVD) and coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. more

Low-fat diet does not reduce risk of colorectal cancer 

In an article in the February 8 JAMA, Shirley A. A. Beresford, Ph.D., of the University of Washington, Seattle, and colleagues with the Women's Health Initiative (a study which included nearly 50,000 women) analyzed data from the WHI Dietary Modification Trial to determine the effect of a low-fat eating pattern on risk of colorectal cancer in postmenopausal women. Previous trials examining this association have been inconclusive. more

Studies of obese children reveal body-weight control hormone  

A single change in a particular brain hormone can increase a person's risk of obesity, two new studies in the February 8, 2006, Cell Metabolism reveal. The researchers found that obese children are more likely to carry a rare variant of so-called -melanocyte-stimulating hormone (-MSH) than children of normal weight. more

Berkeley researchers lay groundwork for cell version of DNA chip

A new technique in which single strands of synthetic DNA are used to firmly fasten biological cells to non-biological surfaces has been developed by researchers with the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the University of California at Berkeley. This technique holds promise for a wide variety of applications, including biosensors, drug-screening technologies, the growing of artificial tissues and the design of neural networks. more

 

Consuming a low fat diet is not protective against anything.