Volume 8 Issue 59
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 28-Feb-2006 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 1-Mar-2006

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
Vidyya.
All rights reserved.

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Risk for low sexual desire increases in women after surgical menopause

A cross-sectional survey of European women shows that surgically menopausal women are at increased risk for low sexual desire. In the March 2006 issue of The Journal of Sexual Medicine, researchers have published the first-ever multi-cultural prevalence study using multi-dimensional psychometrically valid outcomes to determine if women who undergo surgical menopause have a greater risk of low sexual interest compared with that of pre-menopausal or naturally menopausal women. more  

Some benign breast lesions could be dangerous

Certain breast lesions diagnosed as benign on core needle biopsy have cancer at surgical excision and thus should be removed, according to a study appearing in the March issue of Radiology. more

HIV/AIDS rates in Tijuana, Mexico increasing at alarming rate

A study by researchers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) School of Medicine indicates that the rate of HIV/AIDS infection in Tijuana, Mexico is increasing, and much higher than had been previously estimated. The findings are based on data compiled by a team of researchers working in San Diego and Mexico to create a population-based model in order to estimate HIV infection rates. more  

A case of mistaken molecular identity

Researchers in Argentina have determined that night blindness is a new clinical symptom of Chagas disease. A team led by Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) international research scholar Mariano Jorge Levin and Cristina Paveto of the Institute for Genetic Engineering and Molecular Biology (INGEBI), National Research Council, National Council of Scientific Research and Technology in Buenos Aires, found that the immune system of individuals with the tropical disease can shut down a key reaction in the retina, causing night blindness. more

Cocoa intake linked to lower blood pressure, reduced risk of death 

A study of elderly Dutch men indicates that eating or drinking cocoa is associated with lower blood pressure and a reduced risk of death, according to an article in the February 27 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. more

Higher rates of infection may explain why women have higher risk of death after bypass surgery  

Higher rates of infection among women undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery may explain why women have higher risk of death than men following the procedure, according to a study in the February 27 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. more

Study ties 'new' cell-death mechanism to developmental and degenerative brain disorders

An international research team has provided the first conclusive evidence that neurodevelopmental disorders such as mental retardation and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and ataxias can be caused, at least in part, by specific gene defects that interfere with the electrical impulses of rapid-firing brain nerve cells called bursting neurons. more

 

Hot Cocoa: It does a man's heart good.