Volume 8 Issue 64
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 5-Mar-2006 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 6-Mar-2006

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
© Vidyya.
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Biological attack: Human pathogens, biotoxins, and agricultural threats

A biological attack is the intentional release of a pathogen (disease causing agent) or biotoxin (poisonous substance produced by a living organism) against humans, plants, or animals. An attack against people could be used to cause illness, death, fear, societal disruption, and economic damage. (From the National Acadamies and the Department of Homeland Security) more  

Chemical attack warfare agents, industrial chemicals, and toxins

A chemical attack is the spreading of toxic chemicals with the intent to do harm. A wide variety of chemicals could be made, stolen, or otherwise acquired for use in an attack. Industrial chemical plants or the vehicles used to transport chemicals could also be sabotaged. more

Nuclear attack

Unlike a “dirty bomb” which disperses radioactive material using conventional explosives,1 a nuclear attack is the use of a device that produces a nuclear explosion. A nuclear explosion is caused by an uncontrolled chain reaction that splits atomic nuclei (fission) to produce an intense wave of heat, light, air pressure, and radiation, followed by the production and release of radioactive particles. For ground blasts, these radioactive particles are drawn up into a “mushroom cloud” with dust and debris, producing fallout that can expose people at great distances to radiation. more  

Radiological attack: Dirty bombs and other devices

A radiological attack is the spreading of radioactive material with the intent to do harm. Radioactive materials are used every day in laboratories, medical centers, food irradiation plants, and for industrial uses. If stolen or otherwise acquired, many of these materials could be used in a “radiological dispersal device” (RDD). more

Internet research builds cancer patients' confidence 

Newly diagnosed cancer patients who use the Internet to gather information about their disease have a more positive outlook and are more active participants in their treatment, according to a new Temple University study published in the March 2006 issue of the Journal of Health Communication. more

How nice, brown rice: Study shows rice bran lowers blood pressure in rats  

Thousands of years ago, humans began scrubbing off and discarding the outer layer of long-grain rice, preferring the polished white kernel beneath. Now, for the first time, scientists in Japan have shown that this waste product of rice processing, called rice bran, significantly lowers blood pressure in rats whose hypertension resembles that of humans. more

Saliva test offers new window on caffeine/stress response

Penn State researchers have shown that a simple saliva test may offer a new way to probe the physical consequences of caffeine coupled with stress. more

 

Thousands of years ago, humans began scrubbing off and discarding the outer layer of long-grain rice, preferring the polished white kernel beneath. Now, for the first time, scientists in Japan have shown that this waste product of rice processing, called rice bran, significantly lowers blood pressure.