Volume 8 Issue 69
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 10-Mar-2006 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 11-Mar-2006

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
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Major WHO study concludes calcium supplements can reduce complications during pregnancy

Preeclampsia, the development of high blood pressure and protein in the urine during pregnancy and its more severe complications such as eclampsia, can threaten the lives of both mother and child. While there is no therapy to prevent preeclampsia, a link to calcium deficiency has been suggested. In a study published in the March issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, researchers across the globe, under the auspices of the World Health Organization (WHO), investigated whether a calcium supplement could reduce the complications and mortality from this condition. more  

Concern over rapid rise of chronic kidney disease

Chronic kidney disease is rising rapidly worldwide and is becoming a global healthcare problem, warn experts in this week's BMJ. more

New study reveals promising osteoporosis treatment

A New York University College of Dentistry professor has developed a calcium phosphate-based supplement that -- even at low concentrations -- significantly improves bone strength and thickness without the side effects of many current drug treatments. Dr. Racquel Z. LeGeros, a Professor of Biomaterials and Biomimetics and of Implant Dentistry, presented her research on the supplement at the American Association for Dental Research annual meeting on March 9, 2006. more  

Falling blood pressure not down to drugs, say experts

Blood pressure lowering drugs were not responsible for the population decline in blood pressure seen in many countries in the mid-1980s to the mid-1990s, concludes a study published online by the BMJ today. more

Dramatic changes in U.S. aging highlighted in new census, NIH Report 

The face of aging in the United States is changing dramatically — and rapidly, according to a new U.S. Census Bureau report, commissioned by the National Institute on Aging (NIA). Today’s older Americans are very different from their predecessors, living longer, having lower rates of disability, achieving higher levels of education and less often living in poverty. And the baby boomers, the first of whom celebrated their 60th birthdays in 2006, promise to redefine further what it means to grow older in America. more

Q&A: Basic questions about embryonic stem cells  

Stem cells are cells that have the remarkable potential to develop into many different cell types in the body. Serving as a sort of repair system for the body, they can theoretically divide without limit to replenish other cells for as long as the person or animal is still alive. When a stem cell divides, each "daughter" cell has the potential to either remain a stem cell or become another type of cell with a more specialized function, such as a muscle cell, a red blood cell, or a brain cell. more

Thalidomide, lenalidomide show promise against Lou Gehrig's disease

New animal research suggests that two well-studied drugs, thalidomide and its derivative, lenalidomide, might extend the survival of patients with the neurological disorder amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease. more

 

In a study published in the March issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, researchers investigated whether a calcium supplement could reduce the complications and mortality from preeclampsia.