Volume 8 Issue 73
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 14-Mar-2006 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 15-Mar-2006

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
© Vidyya.
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Hospitalized patients with schizophrenia more likely to have medical and surgical complications

A Johns Hopkins study of more than 1,700 patients with schizophrenia hospitalized for medical or surgical care unrelated to their mental disorder shows they are at least twice as likely as similar patients without schizophrenia to suffer dangerous and expensive adverse events. The adverse events are associated with poor outcomes, including death. more  

Early treatment with blood pressure meds may reduce hypertension

Patients experiencing high normal blood pressure (HNBP), a precursor to hypertension, may benefit from early treatment with pharmacological therapy, according to new research presented today at the American College of Cardiology's 55th Annual Scientific Session. HNBP, often referred to as "prehypertension," is associated with double the normal risk of heart attacks and strokes. ACC.06 is the premier cardiovascular medical meeting, bringing together more than 30,000 cardiologists to further breakthroughs in cardiovascular medicine. more

Complex artery disease best treated with simple approach

Cardiologists increasingly use non-invasive methods to treat patients with diseased arteries that previously required open-heart surgery. A late-breaking clinical trial presented today during the American College of Cardiology's inaugural Innovation in Intervention: the i2 Summit 2006. Innovation in Intervention: i2 Summit is an annual meeting for practicing cardiovascular interventionalists sponsored by the American College of Cardiology in partnership with the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions. more  

Post-stent maintenance therapies questioned

Patients admitted to the hospital with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) are often treated with a catheter-based procedure known as percutaneous coronary intervention, or PCI. But doctors are unclear about the optimal antithrombotic therapy to prescribe after procedure to prevent clotting, and new research suggests a possible alternative, according to a study presented today at the American College of Cardiology's 55th Annual Scientific Session. ACC.06 is the premier cardiovascular medical meeting, bringing together more than 30,000 cardiologists to further breakthroughs in cardiovascular medicine. more

Yale researchers identify gene depth protects against kidney stones 

Yale School of Medicine researchers report in Nature Genetics this week that they have identified a gene whose function protects the body against kidney stones. more

Statement by USDA Chief Veterinary Officer John Clifford (DVM) regarding positive BSE test results in Alabama, U.S.A.  

“We received a positive result on a Western blot confirmatory test conducted at the USDA laboratories in Ames, Iowa, on samples from an animal that had tested “inconclusive” on a rapid screening test performed on Friday, March 10. more

Researchers discover a unique molecular profile for lung cancer

A team of researchers has found that the expression pattern of certain microRNAs, or miRNAs, may predict tumor aggressiveness in some patients with lung cancer. These findings indicate that miRNAs may represent a new class of diagnostic and prognostic tools for lung cancer. The study is a collaboration among researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio; the Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; National Cancer Center Research Institute, Tokyo, Japan; and the Center for Cancer Research at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), which is part of the National Institutes of Health. The study results appear in the March 13, 2006, issue of Cancer Cell*. more

 

A case of mad cow disease has been discovered in Alabama, U.S.A.