Volume 8 Issue 80
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 21-Mar-2006 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 22-Mar-2006

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
Vidyya.
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Aggression-related gene weakens brain's impulse control circuits

A version of a gene previously linked to impulsive violence appears to weaken brain circuits that regulate impulses, emotional memory and thinking in humans, researchers at the National Institutes of Health's (NIH) National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) have found. Brain scans revealed that people with this version especially males tended to have relatively smaller emotion-related brain structures, a hyperactive alarm center and under-active impulse control circuitry. The study identifies neural mechanisms by which this gene likely contributes to risk for violent and impulsive behavior through effects on the developing brain. more  

Innovative approach affords Binghamton University researchers clearer view of autism

Using new technology and a unique approach, Binghamton University researchers are hoping to help children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) deal with their most common and problematic areas of deficit - social and life skills. more

Novel vaccine approach stimulates protective immunity against listeria

When bacterial pathogens attack the surface of a cell, vaccine-induced antibodies can mount a formidable defense and fend off the bad bugs. The trouble comes when antibodies cannot recognize the pathogen because the bacteria have infected the cell and are hidden, growing inside the cell's wall. more  

Bariatric surgery leads to long-term blood pressure changes in extremely obese patients

Severely obese patients may experience significant, long-term improvements in blood pressure as they lose substantial amounts of weight after gastric bypass surgery, thereby contributing to their overall health, according to a new University of Pittsburgh study, published in the March issue of the Archives of Surgery. Excess body weight is associated with a host of health complications including diabetes, certain cancers and joint stress, with nearly two-thirds of very obese patients suffering from high blood pressure the primary risk factor for both stroke and heart disease. more

Medication plus oral contraceptive may improve female pattern hair loss  

Finasteride, a medication approved to treat hair loss in men, may also improve the condition in women when combined with oral contraceptives, according to an article in the March issue of Archives of Dermatology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. more

Scientists discover that widely available drug also helps fight kidney disease  

A widely available drug may be effective in treating kidney disease, report scientists at the University of California, Santa Barbara. They describe the discovery in the online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academies of Science published the week of March 20. more

Increased cognitive control in Tourette's syndrome

Though the repetitive vocal and motor tics characteristic of Tourette's syndrome may suggest an inability to control involuntary actions at the cognitive level, researchers have now found evidence that young people with Tourette's syndrome actually exhibit a greater level of cognitive control over their movements than their non-affected peers do. The research findings are consistent with a greater need for cognitive control of actions in individuals with Tourette's syndrome, and they offer clues to which regions of the brain may be involved in the generation of the syndrome's characteristic behavioral tics. The findings are reported by Dr. Georgina Jackson and colleagues at the University of Nottingham, UK in the March 21st issue of Current Biology. more

 

Finasteride, a medication approved to treat hair loss in men, may also improve the condition in women when combined with oral contraceptives.