Volume 8 Issue 92
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 2-Apr-2006 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 3-Apr-2006

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
Vidyya.
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New device could cut chemotherapy deaths

A new method of delivering chemotherapy to cancer patients without incurring side effects such as hair loss and vomiting is being developed. more  

Single cell amoeba increases MRSA numbers 1000 -fold

Scientists in the UK have found that a type of amoeba acts as an incubator for MRSA bacteria. As amoebae are often found in healthcare environments this discovery has implications for the infection control strategies adopted by hospitals. more

Multimarker assay for ovarian cancer most promising to date

The search for a specific protein that could help diagnose ovarian cancer in its early stages has for years eluded researchers who are seeking a reliable and accurate test for the disease. Instead of searching for a single protein, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine used a new technology to analyze a large number of proteins, or potential biomarkers, from a very small sample of serum from women with ovarian cancer. more  

Study demonstrates that lung cancer susceptibility runs in families

Studying thousands of people, researchers at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center have documented a 25 percent increased risk of developing one of a number of cancers in first-degree relatives of lung cancer patients who have never smoked compared to families of people who neither smoke nor have lung cancer. more

Research suggests that immune response protects against brain tumor development 

In their quest to determine whether immune system surveillance guards against brain tumor development, researchers at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center have found that allergies and asthma that stimulate inflammation may be protective, but use of antihistamines to control the inflammation could eliminate that protection. more

Pigment is focus of macular degeneration research  

Whether a tiny yellow pigment is the main thing standing between many older people and macular degeneration is under study at the Medical College of Georgia. more

FDA approves Prograf to prevent rejection of heart transplant

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA,) approved Prograf (tacrolimus), a drug that suppresses the body's immune reaction, for the prevention of graft rejection in the recipients of heart transplants. Prograf capsules and Prograf for injection, the first products approved in the United States for heart transplantation in eight years, had been previously approved for the prevention of graft rejection in the recipients of liver and kidney transplants. more

 

The FDA approved Prograf (tacrolimus), a drug that suppresses the body's immune reaction, for the prevention of graft rejection in the recipients of heart transplants.