Volume 9 Issue 100
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 11-Apr-2007 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 12-Apr-2007

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
© Vidyya.
All rights reserved.

HONcode accreditation seal. We subscribe to the HONcode principles.
Verify here
.

  

 


Lithium builds gray matter in bipolar brains, UCLA study shows

Neuroscientists at UCLA have shown that lithium, long the standard treatment for bipolar disorder, increases the amount of gray matter in the brains of patients with the illness. more  

Misusing vitamin to foil drug test may be toxic; plus, it doesn't work

Taking excessive doses of a common vitamin in an attempt to defeat drug screening tests may send the user to the hospital—or worse. more

Fragile X, Down syndromes linked to faulty brain communication

The two most prevalent forms of genetic mental retardation, Fragile X and Down syndromes, may share a common cause, according to researchers at Stanford University School of Medicine. The problem, a crippled communication network in the brain, may also be associated with autism. more  

Study suggests use of stem cell transplantation is beneficial treatment of type 1 diabetes

A therapy that includes stem cell transplantation induced extended insulin independence in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, according to a preliminary study in the April 11 issue of JAMA. more

Study pries into ovarian cancer's deadly secrets  

A new University of Michigan Medical School study sheds light on cell defects that lead to one common type of ovarian cancer and puts forth a promising new mouse model that already is being used for preclinical drug testing. more

Antiwrinkle compound causes pathological reaction in skin cells  

Researchers from Université Laval’s Faculty of Medicine have discovered that a compound commonly used in many antiwrinkle products causes a pathological reaction in skin cells. Guillaume Morissette, Lucie Germain, and François Marceau present their conclusions about the mode of action of this substance—called DMAE—in the latest edition of the British Journal of Dermatology. more

Eye diseases gave great painters different vision of their work, Stanford ophthalmologist says

After writing two books on the topic of artists and eye disease, the Stanford University School of Medicine ophthalmologist decided to go one step further and create images that would show how artists with eye disease actually saw their world and their canvases. Combining computer simulation with his own medical knowledge, Marmor has recreated images of some of the masterpieces of the French impressionistic painters Claude Monet and Edgar Degas who continued to work while they struggled with cataracts and retinal disease. more

© Vidyya. All rights reserved.

Eye diseases gave great painters different vision of their work, Stanford ophthalmologist says