Volume 9 Issue 130
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 11-May-2007 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 12-May-2007

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
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Stenting of abdominal arteries offers welcome relief for 'intestinal angina'

Using catheter techniques perfected in the arteries of the heart, interventional cardiologists are successfully treating chronic mesenteric ischemia, a condition akin to intestinal angina. According to a study reported at the 30th Annual Scientific Sessions of the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI), May 9–12, 2007, in Orlando, FL, angioplasty and stenting of clogged arteries in the abdomen successfully restored blood flow to the intestines and relieved painful symptoms in more than 90 percent of patients, without major complications. more  

Online education program better source of information for patients

Patients who used the American Heart Association's online heart disease education program were more aware of treatment options than other patients, researchers reported at the American Heart Association's 8th Scientific Forum on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research in Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke. more

One pill may be better than two for treating patients with high blood pressure

Adults with high blood pressure and additional risk factors for heart disease may benefit more from taking one tablet rather than two, if their current treatment combines the lipid-lowering medication atorvastatin with the blood pressure-lowering medication amlodipine, researchers reported at the American Heart Association's 8th Scientific Forum on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research in Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke. more  

New research helps overcome major CPAP problem

For the first time, a group based cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) intervention has been demonstrated to markedly increase acceptance and adherence to CPAP treatment for sufferers of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). more

Estrogen is important for bone health in men as well as women  

Although women are four times more likely than men to develop osteoporosis, or porous bone, one in 12 men also suffer from the disease, which can lead to debilitating - or even life-threatening - fractures, mainly of the spine, hip and wrist. The underlying causes of osteoporosis are numerous, but in women, low estrogen levels after menopause have been considered an important factor. more

License to sin -- Asking people to think about vice increases their likelihood of giving in 

A new study by researchers from Duke, USC, and UPenn is the first to explore how questioning can affect our behavior when we have mixed feelings about an issue. The study, forthcoming in the June issue of the Journal of Consumer Research, found that asking people questions, like how many times they expect to give in to a temptation they know they should resist, increases how many times they will actually give in to it. more

Breakdown of myelin implicated in Alzheimer’s, UCLA research shows

Wisdom comes with age (doesn't it?), but not without a process that takes place in the brain called myelination. Myelin is the fatty sheath that coats the axons of the nerves, allowing for efficient conduction of nerve impulses. It is key to the fast processing speeds that underlie our higher cognitive functioning, including, yes, wisdom. more

© Vidyya. All rights reserved.

Asking people questions, like how many times they expect to give in to a temptation they know they should resist, increases how many times they will actually give in to it.