Volume 9 Issue 142
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 23-May-2007 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 24-May-2007

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
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Flaws in colonoscopies may increase risk of colon cancer

Colonoscopies are considered the gold standard for detecting colon cancer, the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Research presented today at Digestive Disease Week® 2007 (DDW®) discusses contributing factors that could prevent patients from getting optimal results from their colonoscopy, including age of the patient, location of the screening and proper technician training. DDW is the largest international gathering of physicians and researchers in the fields of gastroenterology, hepatology, endoscopy and gastrointestinal surgery. more  

Sexual orientation affects how we navigate and recall lost objects, but age just targets gender

Researchers at the University of Warwick have found that sexual orientation has a real effect on how we perform mental tasks such as navigating with a map in a car but that old age does not discriminate on grounds of sexual orientation and withers all men’s minds alike just ahead of women’s. more

Immune antibodies penetrate neurons to clear Alzheimer's-linked amyloid

Researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College have gotten much closer to understanding how immune-based therapies can treat Alzheimer's disease — by studying how antibodies go inside brain cells to reduce levels of Alzheimer's-linked amyloid peptides that form plaques between neurons. more  

Study identifying alteration in gene associated with uterine cancer

Researchers at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) today announced the discovery of previously unrecognized alterations in a gene called FGFR2 in a subset of endometrial cancers, the most common gynecologic cancer in the United States. The mutations in FGFR2 result in uncontrolled cell division, a hallmark of cancer. more

System to pinpoint airline passengers who contaminate cabins  

Researchers developing a system that uses mathematical models and sensors to locate passengers releasing hazardous materials or pathogens inside airline cabins have shown that the technique can track a substance to an area the size of a single seat. more

Sling surgery is more effective than Burch for bladder control in women 

In the largest and most rigorous U.S. trial comparing two traditional operations for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in women, a team of urologists and urogynecologists supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has found that a sling procedure helps more women achieve dryness than the Burch technique. The study is being released early by the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) to coincide with a presentation at the annual meeting of the American Urological Association on May 21, 2007. Results will appear in the May 24 print edition of NEJM. more

NIDDK Booklet: Bladder control for women

A comprehensive introduction to the causes, symptoms, and treatments for bladder control problems in women. more

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The inadvertent release of infectious pathogens inside an aircraft is especially dangerous during lengthy international flights.