Volume 9 Issue 21
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 21-Jan-2007 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 22-Jan-2007

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
© Vidyya.
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Mayo Clinic Cancer Center -- Surgery and adjuvant therapy may work for pancreatic cancer

In the largest single-institution retrospective study to date, researchers at Mayo Clinic Cancer Center have shown that giving patients both radiation and chemotherapy after completely removing invasive pancreatic cancer may improve overall survival rates. The study's lead author, a radiation oncology resident in Rochester, Michele Corsini, M.D., presented the findings Saturday, Jan. 20, at the 2007 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium. more  

Royal College issues revised guidelines for face transplantation

In the light of new information on facial transplantation—including the psychological and ethical aspects of the controversial procedure—a Working Party of the Royal College of Surgeons of England now endorses moving cautiously forward in performing further face transplants, according to a report published in the Jan. 27 issue of Transplantation. more

Combination therapy spares some head and neck patients from surgery

Giving patients with head and neck cancer a combination of chemotherapy and radiation therapy controls the cancer and allows many patients to avoid additional surgery to the neck, according to a study presented at the plenary session today at the Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Cancer Symposium in Rancho Mirage, Calif., co-sponsored by the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the American Head and Neck Society. more  

No evidence to support many off-label uses of atypical antipsychotics

Some newer antipsychotic medications approved to treat schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are being prescribed to millions of Americans for depression, dementia, and other psychiatric disorders without strong evidence that such off-label uses are effective, according to a new analysis by HHS’ Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. more

Comparative effectiveness of management strategies for renal artery stenosis  

Renal artery stenosis (RAS) is defined as the narrowing of the lumen of the renal artery. Atherosclerosis accounts for 90 percent of cases of RAS. Atherosclerotic RAS (ARAS) is a progressive disease that may occur alone or in combination with hypertension and ischemic kidney disease. more

Choosing non-opioid analgesics for osteoarthritis (clinician guide)  

This guide summarizes clinical evidence on the effectiveness and safety of non-opioid analgesics for osteoarthritis. It covers most available over-the-counter (OTC) medications and prescription non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The reviewed drugs are listed on the back page. This guide does not address non-pharmacologic therapies such as diet, exercise, acupuncture, or surgical interventions. more

Effectiveness of noninvasive diagnostic tests for breast abnormalities

Because an abnormal screening mammogram requires a diagnostic test to confirm whether cancer is present, many women who do not have cancer will undergo diagnostic tests. Typically, suspicious lesions are evaluated with tissue biopsy, either by excision or by needle sampling. If a noninvasive diagnostic test were available that could accurately exclude malignancy, many women with an abnormal mammogram who do not have cancer could avoid biopsy. However, such a test must be sufficiently accurate not to miss cancer in those women who have it. Positron emission tomography (PET) scanning, scintimammography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasonography (US) have been proposed for this purpose, yet the accuracy of these noninvasive diagnostic technologies in excluding breast cancer in women at average risk remains unclear. more

© Vidyya. All rights reserved.

Some newer antipsychotic medications approved to treat schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are being prescribed to millions of Americans for depression, dementia, and other psychiatric disorders without strong evidence that such off-label uses are effective.