Volume 9 Issue 27
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 27-Jan-2007 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 28-Jan-2007

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
© Vidyya.
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New diabetes research: Half of Americans have gene that affects how body burns sugar

A recent study by a Saint Louis University researcher confirms findings that about half of the U.S. population has a version of a gene that causes them to metabolize food differently, putting them at greater risk of developing diabetes. more  

NIH study finds MRI more sensitive than CT in diagnosing most common form of acute stroke

Results from the most comprehensive study to compare two imaging techniques for the emergency diagnosis of suspected acute stroke show that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide a more sensitive diagnosis than computed tomography (CT) for acute ischemic stroke. The difference between MRI and CT was attributable to MRI's superiority for detection of acute ischemic stroke—the most common form of stroke, caused by a blood clot. The study was conducted by physicians at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), a part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). more

Disorderly protein brings order to cell division

St. Jude study shows disorderliness of the p27 yoke that suppresses activity of the cell-division molecule CDK2 is key to the ability of p27 to participate in its own destruction and set CDK2 free. more  

Novel EGFR antibody outperforms cetuximab in mouse model of lung cancer

Antibodies that selectively bind and destroy cancer cells represent some of the most promising cancer therapy approaches being developed today. Several of these antibodies have reached the market, including cetuximab (Erbitux®, ImClone Systems), which targets the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) protein. However, a study conducted at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Ludwig Center at Dana-Farber/Harvard Medical School now suggests that antibodies binding a particular protein conformation, caused by hyperactivation, might have distinct therapeutic advantages over antibodies, like cetuximab, that bind to wild-type (normal) target proteins. more

How does your brain respond when you think about gambling or taking risks?  

Should you leave your comfortable job for one that pays better but is less secure? Should you have a surgery that is likely to extend your life but poses some risk that you will not survive the operation? Should you invest in a risky startup company whose stock may soar even though you could lose your entire investment? In the Jan. 26 issue of the journal Science, UCLA psychologists present the first neuroscience research comparing how our brains evaluate the possibility of gaining versus losing when making risky decisions. more

Heavy drinking takes excessive toll on women with hepatitis C  

Women tend to survive longer than men if infected with the liver-destroying hepatitis C virus (HCV) -- but if they drink heavily, that survival advantage completely disappears, according to a new study. more

Both genetics and dopaminergic neurotransmission have a role in delirium tremens

Alcohol-dependent individuals have a five to 10 percent lifetime risk of developing delirium tremens (DT) following alcohol withdrawal. DT is characterized by a clouding of consciousness, mental confusion or disorientation, and is often accompanied by hallucinations and agitation. Although the symptoms of DT are relatively well known, the pathophysiology of DT is less clear. A review of formerly published research has found that both genetics and the regulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission appear to play a role in the pathophysiological process of the development of DT. more

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UCLA psychologists present the first neuroscience research comparing how brains evaluate gaining versus losing when making risky decisions.