Volume 9 Issue 30
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 30-Jan-2007 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 31-Jan-2007

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
© Vidyya.
All rights reserved.

HONcode accreditation seal. We subscribe to the HONcode principles.
Verify here
.

  

 


Many people with MS report financial strain related to health care

A Harvard-based study of insurance coverage involving a nationwide sampling of people with multiple sclerosis found that although they had higher than average rates of insurance coverage, many experienced financial strain related to obtaining adequate health care, including paying for their medications. The study, commissioned by the National MS Society, was conducted by Drs. Lisa Iezzoni and Long Ngo and published in an early online release January 29, 2007 in the journal Multiple Sclerosis. more  

Hormone drug type makes survival difference in advanced breast cancer

Aromatase inhibitors, a type of hormone therapy used to treat advanced breast cancer in postmenopausal women, result in a small but significant increase in overall survival when compared to other hormone treatments, according to a new systematic review of studies. more

Temple University Hospital investigates treatment for cervical dysplasia

Temple University Hospital's Center For Women's Health is participating in a national study to determine the safety and effectiveness of an investigational treatment for cervical dysplasia. According to the American Cancer Society, approximately 500,000 women are diagnosed with high-grade cervical dysplasia each year, with roughly 10,000 cases progressing to cervical cancer. more  

Vaginal birth increases risk of hemorrhage in newborns

The first researchers to use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to study the brains of a large group of babies soon after birth found a small amount of bleeding in and around the brains of one in four babies who were delivered vaginally. The study appears in the February issue of Radiology. more

Risk for stroke, death not higher for sickle cell children with early complications  

Children with sickle cell disease who experienced major complications such as pain and lung disease early in life are at no greater risk for stroke or death during later childhood, new research from UT Southwestern Medical Center shows. more

Predicting the risk of rheumatoid arthritis for early arthritis patients  

Marked by chronic inflammation of the joints and tissue, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a painful and potentially disabling autoimmune disease. A wealth of research supports early aggressive treatment with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) as the best course for preventing joint damage and avoiding the fate of a wheelchair. Still, the use of DMARDs, even the widely prescribed and generally safe methotrexate, brings the risk of liver damage and other serious complications. more

HIV dementia alarmingly high in Africa

An international study led by Johns Hopkins suggests that the rate of HIV-associated dementia is so high in sub-Saharan Africa that HIV dementia along with Alzheimer’s disease and dementia from strokes may be among the most common forms of dementia in the world. more

© Vidyya. All rights reserved.

In the first study of HIV dementia on the African continent using rigorous neurological and neuropsychological tests, 31 percent of a small but presumably representative group of HIV-positive patients in Uganda were found to have HIV dementia