Volume 9 Issue 34
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 3-Feb-2007 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 4-Feb-2007

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
© Vidyya.
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Lavender and tea tree oils may cause breast growth in boys

A study published in this week’s issue of the New England Journal of Medicine suggests that repeated topical use of products containing lavender oil and/or tea tree oil may cause prepubertal gynecomastia, a rare condition resulting in enlarged breast tissue in boys prior to puberty, and for which a cause is seldom identified. more  

Allergy to hair dye increasing

Allergic reactions to hair dye are increasing as more and younger people dye their hair, warn researchers in this week’s BMJ. more

Brain's reward circuit activity ebbs and flows with a woman's hormonal cycle

Fluctuations in sex hormone levels during women's menstrual cycles affect the responsiveness of their brains' reward circuitry, an imaging study at the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), a component of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has revealed. While women were winning rewards, their circuitry was more active if they were in a menstrual phase preceding ovulation and dominated by estrogen, compared to a phase when estrogen and progesterone are present. more  

Common blood pressure drug reduces progressive muscle degeneration in mice

Scientists supported in part by the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) and National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) have found that that the commonly prescribed blood pressure medication losartan improves muscle regeneration and repair in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a devastating disease characterized by rapid progression of muscle degeneration in boys and young men. more

Pills or papayas? Survey finds Americans want healthful foods, not more medicines  

If you thought Americans would rather pop a pill to treat illness than make major diet changes, think again. A new survey shows the vast majority would rather change their diets—including trying a vegetarian diet—than use medicines. According to a nationally representative survey of 1,022 adults conducted in mid-January by Opinion Research Corporation, 69 percent of Americans would prefer to try a dietary approach. Just 21 percent preferred treating diabetes with medicines. more

Heart disease deaths in American women decline  

The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health announced today that the number of heart disease deaths in American women is decreasing. Newly analyzed data shows that the number of women who die from heart disease has shifted from 1 in 3 women to 1 in 4 — a decrease of nearly 17,000 deaths from 2003 to 2004. more

Improving communication in the ICU about end-of-life care in the ICU reduces symptoms of stress, anxiety, and depression in family members

An intervention to improve communication between clinicians in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and family members of a dying patient significantly reduces feelings of stress, anxiety, and depression in the family members, according to a study that appears in the February 1, 2007 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. The study, funded in part by the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR), a component of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), showed that this intervention also allows family members to express their emotions and arrive at a more realistic expectation of the outcome. more

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The vast majority of Americans would rather change their diets—including trying a vegetarian diet—than use medicines.