Volume 9 Issue 4
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 4-Jan-2007 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 5-Jan-2007

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
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Pregnant women in the dark on prenatal screening

Soon-to-be mums admit they feel 'left in the dark' when it comes to being told about the possible implications of prenatal screening - tests which could lead them down a path where they have to make difficult decisions about their unborn child. more  

Risk factors for diabetes following liver transplant

A new study on risk factors of new-onset diabetes mellitus (NODM) following liver transplant found that a history of obesity, impaired fasting glucose and hepatitis C infection (HCV) paired with the use of a particular immunosuppressant are associated with an increased risk of NODM. Since all of these factors can be detected prior to undergoing a transplant, treatment should be tailored to the patient's risk. more

Bottleneck in blood supply makes brain vulnerable to strokes

A team of UC San Diego physicists and neuroscientists has discovered a bottleneck in the network of blood vessels in the brain that makes it vulnerable to strokes. The finding may explain the origin of the puzzling damage to the brain’s gray matter often detected in brain scans, especially among the elderly. more  

Brain studies reveal the mechanisms of the voluntary control of visual attention

Neuroscientists at Duke University have mapped the timing and sequence of neural activations that unfold in the brain when people focus their attention on specific locations in their visual fields. more

Estrogen curbs appetite in same way as the hormone leptin  

Estrogen regulates the brain's energy metabolism in the same way as the hormone leptin, leading the way to a viable approach to tackling obesity in people resistant to leptin, researchers at Yale School of Medicine report in the December 31 online issue of Nature Medicine. more

What memories are made of  

Why is it that amnesia patients can't remember their names or addresses, but they do remember how to hold a fork? It's because memories come in many flavors, says Fred Helmstetter, professor of psychology at the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee (UWM). Remembering what is not the same as remembering how. more

Researchers use brain scans to predict when people will buy products

For the first time, researchers have used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to determine what parts of the brain are active when people consider whether to purchase a product and to predict whether or not they ultimately choose to buy the product. The study appears in the journal Neuron and was co-authored by scientists at Carnegie Mellon University, Stanford University and the MIT Sloan School of Management. more

© Vidyya. All rights reserved.

Buyer be wary: Researchers have used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to determine what parts of the brain are active when people consider whether to purchase a product and to predict whether or not they ultimately choose to buy the product.