Volume 9 Issue 60
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 1-Mar-2007 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 2-Mar-2007

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
© Vidyya.
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Researchers wake up viruses inside tumors to image and then destroy cancers

Researchers have found a way to activate Epstein-Barr viruses inside tumors as a way to identify patients whose infection can then be manipulated to destroy their tumors. They say this strategy could offer a novel way of treating many cancers associated with Epstein-Barr, including at least four different types of lymphoma and nasopharyngeal and gastric cancers. more  

Adolescent dieting may predict weight gain

Adolescents who go on diets to lose weight may be significantly increasing their odds of gaining weight, say researchers at the University of Minnesota. more

Green tea and COX-2 inhibitors combine to slow growth of prostate cancer

Drinking a nice warm cup of green tea has long been touted for its healthful benefits, both real and anecdotal. But now researchers have found that a component of green tea, combined with low doses of a COX-2 inhibitor, could slow the spread of human prostate cancer. more  

New study in the journal Sleep finds that treating insomnia is far less costly than ignoring it

Insomniacs are advised to get early treatment for their sleep disorder not only so they can start feeling better faster, but it can also save them and their employers money in the long run. A study published in the March 1st issue of the journal SLEEP finds that, as opposed to treating insomnia, failure to treat it is much more costly. more

Comparing newer antipsychotic medications after older one fails  

Quetiapine, and to some extent olanzapine, may be more effective than risperidone among patients who were originally taking, but had to discontinue, perphenazine—an older, first generation antipsychotic medication. However, patient responses varied considerably. more

Modified ligament surgery improves outcomes for baseball pitchers, other athletes  

In the largest study of its kind, surgeons at Hospital for Special Surgery have determined that by modifying a classic ligament surgery, they can return more athletes, such as baseball players, to their prior level of competition. The modified surgery repairs a torn medial collateral ligament (MCL), which links and stabilizes bones of the lower and upper arm where they meet at the elbow. more

OSA increasingly associated with cardiovascular disease

Cardiovascular disease can pose a threat to both men and women. While a diet rich in fat and high in cholesterol as well as lack of exercise can contribute to cardiovascular disease, a study published in the March 1st issue of the journal SLEEP finds that people with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are at an increased risk of having cardiovascular disease. more

© Vidyya. All rights reserved.

In the largest study of its kind, surgeons at Hospital for Special Surgery have determined that by modifying a classic ligament surgery, they can return more athletes, such as baseball players, to their prior level of competition.