Volume 9 Issue 73
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 15-Mar-2007 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 16-Mar-2007

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
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Elevated autoantibodies linked to preeclampsia

Women who develop preeclampsia during pregnancy are more likely to develop certain dangerous autoantibodies than women with normal pregnancies, and these autoantibodies are still present two years after childbirth in about 20 percent of women who had the disorder, scientists from the University of Pittsburgh report in the March issue of Hypertension, the journal of the American Heart Association. more  

Noninvasive assessment of plaque deposits may help determine a patient's stroke risk

A new study by researchers at the University of Virginia Health System may change the way physicians assess a patient's risk of having a stroke. more

Erectile dysfunction in diabetes is due to selective defect in the brain

A new study sheds additional light on how erectile dysfunction (ED) interacts with diabetes. The study is another step in uncovering the link between the two disorders, and may lead to improved efficacy in treatments. more  

Blood pressure drug shows potential as lung cancer treatment

A hormone that is important in the control of blood pressure also shrinks lung cancer tumors in mice, suggesting a new way to prevent or treat the deadly cancer, according to scientists at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. more

Obstructive sleep apnea patients show silent brain infarction lesions  

Patients with moderate to severe sleep apnea who have significantly higher serum levels of inflammatory markers that serve as precursors to coronary artery disease, as well as lesions associated with silent brain infarction, have an elevated risk of stroke, according to a group of Japanese medical researchers. more

Is too much exercise a bad thing?  

Doctors at the University of Maryland Medical Center had a mystery on their hands. A 51-year-old physician colleague who looked the picture of health—no cardiovascular risks, a marathon runner who had exercised vigorously each day for 30 years—had just flunked a calcium screening scan of his heart. more

New molecular imaging compound pinpoints cancer spread in mice

Researchers have created a new imaging compound in mice that selectively binds to certain cancer cells and glows, or fluoresces, only when processed by these cells. This cancer-specific fluorescence allowed the investigators to successfully visualize very small tumors in the peritoneum — the tissue that lines the wall of the abdomen — in mice with ovarian cancer. The sensitivity — or ability to accurately detect small clusters of tumor cells — of this approach was 92 percent. more

© Vidyya. All rights reserved.

Doctors at the University of Maryland Medical Center had a mystery on their hands. A 51-year-old physician colleague who looked the picture of health—no cardiovascular risks, a marathon runner who had exercised vigorously each day for 30 years—had just flunked a calcium screening scan of his heart.