Volume 9 Issue 74
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 16-Mar-2007 
Next Update - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 17-Mar-2007

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
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Bleeding during endoscopy: Do anti-inflammatories play a role?

Does an aspirin-a-day increase the risk of bleeding during invasive diagnostic procedure? This is an important concern for many patients who take these and other antiplatelet agents in an effort to reduce heart attacks or strokes. Researchers at the MUHC have shown that antiplatelet drugs do not contribute to post-endoscopic bleeding. Their findings are published in this month's issue of Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics. more  

Ice created in nanoseconds by Sandia's Z machine

Sandia’s huge Z machine, which generates termperatures hottter than the sun, has turned water to ice in nanoseconds. However, don’t expect anything commercial just yet: the ice is hotter than the boiling point of water. "The three phases of water as we know them — cold ice, room temperature liquid, and hot vapor — are actually only a small part of water’s repertory of states," says Sandia researcher Daniel Dolan. "Compressing water customarily heats it. But under extreme compression, it is easier for dense water to enter its solid phase [ice] than maintain the more energetic liquid phase [water]." more

Apple consumers reap heart-health benefits thanks to flavonoid content, says new research

Apples may prove to be a winner when it comes to reducing the risk of heart disease, says a new study of more than 34,000 women. In this study, flavonoid-rich apples were found to be one of three foods (along with red wine and pears) that decrease the risk of mortality for both coronary heart disease (CHD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) among post-menopausal women, The findings were published in the March 2007 American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. more  

"Manly men' bounce back better from injury

For years, experts have said that the strong, silent male is not one to ask for help when he's hurt, and therefore at a disadvantage when it comes to getting better. But new research says this might not be completely accurate. This masculine identity often associated with men in the armed forces and other high-risk occupations may actually encourage and quicken a man's recovery from serious injuries, says a new exploratory study from the University of Missouri-Columbia. The study is the first to quantitatively confirm correlations between masculinity and men's recovery. more

Chest compressions without mouth-to-mouth better for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest  

A study published March 17, 2007 in The Lancet, one of the world’s foremost medical journals, finds that the chances of surviving a cardiac arrest outside a hospital setting are almost twice as high if bystanders perform chest-compression-only resuscitation instead of traditional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with mouth-to-mouth breathing. more

Tiny, spontaneous gene mutations may boost autism risk  

Tiny gene mutations, each individually rare, pose more risk for autism than had been previously thought, suggests a study funded in part by the National Institute of Mental Health, a component of the National Institutes of Health. more

ECG abnormalities warn of heart-related risks in older women

Even minor irregularities on a standard electrocardiogram (ECG) test can be a sign of increased risk for cardiovascular events or death in seemingly healthy older women. Previous studies have shown the predictive value of ECG in men. The new findings come from the first large-scale analysis of ECG forecasting in postmenopausal women with no history of heart disease. more

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This masculine identity often associated with men in the armed forces and other high-risk occupations may actually encourage and quicken a man's recovery from serious injuries.