Volume 11 Issue 43
Published - 14:00 UTC 08:00 EST 15-Feb-2009 
Next Update - 14:00 UC 08:00 EST 16-Feb-2009

Editor: Susan K. Boyer, RN
© Vidyya.
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Guillain-Barré syndrome After HPV vaccine needs monitoring

(15 February 2009: VIDYYA MEDICAL NEWS SERVICE) -- The HPV vaccine does not increase the risk of developing Guillain-Barré syndrome, according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 61st Annual Meeting in Seattle, April 25 to May 2, 2009. Guillain-Barré is a disorder that causes muscle weakness and tingling that can progress to paralysis.

Although it can be life-threatening, most people recover with few remaining problems. The disorder often occurs after an infection; the body’s immune system attacks the peripheral nervous system.

The vaccine was approved in June 2006 for use in girls and women age 9 to 26 to prevent infection with human papilloma virus (HPV) types that are the most common cause of cervical cancer. More than 16 million doses of the vaccine have been distributed.

For the study, researchers examined data from the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System, which is managed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

There were 36 cases of Guillain-Barré reported after HPV vaccination in the United States from 2006 to 2008. The disorder occurred within six weeks after vaccination in 75 percent of the people. In 20 of the people, or 60 percent, HPV was the only vaccine they received at the time, while 16 people, or 40 percent, received the HPV vaccine along with other vaccines.

“Our results show that Guillain-Barré is not occurring more often after HPV vaccination than it does in the general population,” said study author Nizar Souayah, MD, of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey in Newark and a member of the American Academy of Neurology. “However, the fact that most of these cases occurred within six weeks of vaccination does warrant careful monitoring for any additional cases and continued analysis.”

The American Academy of Neurology, an association of more than 21,000 neurologists and neuroscience professionals, is dedicated to promoting the highest quality patient-centered neurologic care. A neurologist is a doctor with specialized training in diagnosing, treating and managing disorders of the brain and nervous system such as multiple sclerosis, restless legs syndrome, Alzheimer’s disease, narcolepsy, and stroke.

For more information about the American Academy of Neurology, visit www.aan.com.

The AAN 61st Annual Meeting, the world’s largest gathering of neurology professionals, takes place April 25 to May 2, 2009, in Seattle. Visit www.aan.com/am for more information.

To access 2009 AAN Annual Meeting abstracts available February 25, 2009, visit http://www.aan.com/go/science/abstracts.

Return to Vidyya Medical News Service for 15 February 2009

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Information appearing on the Vidyya Medical News Service is not intended as a substitute for professional medical care. Seek professional medical help and follow your health care provider's advice.

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